The California Attorney General recently approved modified regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). One part of the modified regulations bans “dark patterns” on a website. What are dark patterns? Public comments to the proposed regulations describe dark patterns as deliberate attempts to subvert or impair a consumer’s choice to opt-out on a website.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced this week that the Office of Administrative Law approved additional California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, which became effective March 15, 2021.

The additional changes to the regulations primarily affect businesses that sell the personal information of California residents. The changes include a uniform Opt-Out Icon for the

California Governor Gavin Newsom, along with Attorney General Xavier Becerra, Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego), and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (D-Lakewood), announced the appointment of the five-member inaugural board for the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) this week.

The Board was established by the California Consumer Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) and

A federal District Court in California recently dismissed a lawsuit against Walmart that arose from an alleged data breach. (Gardiner v. Walmart, Inc., 20-cv-04618-JSW (N.D. Cal., March 5, 2021). Among other things, the court determined that California’s Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) does not apply retroactively, dismissing the CCPA claim because the plaintiff had not

This week, Consumer Reports published a Model State Privacy Act. The Consumer advocacy organization proposed model legislation “to ensure that companies are required to honor consumers’ privacy.” The model legislation is similar to the California Consumer Privacy Act, but seeks to protect consumer privacy rights “by default.”  Some additional provisions of the model law

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) requires businesses covered by the CCPA to notify their employees of the categories of personal information the business collects about employees and the purposes for which the categories of personal information are used. The categories of personal information are broadly defined in the CCPA and include personal information such

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) expands the definition of personal information as it currently exists in the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The CPRA adds “sensitive personal information” as a defined term, which means:

(l) personal information that reveals:

(A) a consumer’s social security, driver’s license, state identification card, or passport number;

(B) a

Proposition 24 is known as the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA). It is on the ballot in California on November 3, and if it passes it will amend and expand certain provisions of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Some say it’s CCPA 2.0, however, there are some provisions that make the CPRA