Proposition 24 is known as the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA). It is on the ballot in California on November 3, and if it passes it will amend and expand certain provisions of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Some say it’s CCPA 2.0, however, there are some provisions that make the CPRA

Recently we wrote about two amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) that were awaiting signature on Governor Newsom’s desk: AB 1281, which extends the one-year exemptions for employee information and business to business information for another year until January 1, 2022; and AB 713, which provides an exemption from

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) currently exempts from its provisions certain information collected by a business about a natural person in the course of the person acting as a job applicant, employee, owner, director, officer, medical staff member, or contractor of a business. This exemption is set to expire on December 31,

DataGrail recently released a mid-year report on trends related to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and how it has affected consumers and businesses. The report indicates that consumers are regularly opting out of the sale of their personal information, with the “do not sell” right being the most exercised right, occurring 48 percent of

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) recently qualified for the November 2020 ballot, and if California voters approve this initiative, the CPRA will expand the rights of California residents under the current (stringent) California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), beginning on January 1, 2023.

So what will change under the CPRA?

  1. Creation of the California Privacy

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), touted as the toughest privacy act in the country, went into effect on July 1, 2020. Although the enforcement regulations have been tweaked three times during the last year, this week California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (AG) issued the final set of rules that his office will use to

While the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) went into effect on January 1st of this year, the California Attorney General submitted the final draft of proposed regulations only last month. With the CCPA’s inclusion of a private right of action for California residents to seek actual or statutory damages if their personal information has been

We have previously alerted our readers about the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which went into effect on January 1, 2020. CCPA is one of the strictest consumer privacy laws in the U.S. and is broadly applicable [view related posts].

Although CCPA went into effect on January 1, 2020, enforcement by the California Attorney