Most organizations and online platforms use multifactor authentication (MFA) (also called two-factor authentication) to confirm that the user is an authorized individual and not a scammer or fraudster. We have all been trained to use MFA through our workplaces to gain access to our work emails; tech companies offering free email services are suggesting that

I think that people in general are decent and good. There are always some bad apples, but during crises most people want to help others. During the coronavirus pandemic, many people are doing everything they can to help others, including assisting neighbors, family members, friends and health care workers. Charitable organizations have stepped up to

With more companies hiring, online recruiting scams have re-emerged to prey on job seekers and employers. The Better Business Bureau tracked more than 3,000 recruiting scams in the first 10 months of 2018 with losses in the million dollars.

The online recruiting scam works this way: the scammer fraudulently uses a company’s name and logo, and perhaps the names of the company’s employees handling recruiting or human resources, to solicit applications from job seekers for fake jobs. Many times the companies are household names or long established, which gives the scam an air of legitimacy. Sometimes the solicitation comes by email, but most often it is posted on a professional or recruiting website or social media platform. Like most phishing schemes, the scammer’s email address is similar to, but not the same as the legitimate company’s email address.
Continue Reading Recruiting Scams on the Rise

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a scam alert this week notifying consumers that it has received an up-tick in complaints that scammers are calling consumers claiming they are from the Social Security Administration.

The scammers tell the individual that there has been a computer problem at the Social Security Administration and that they need