The more one uses and shares on social media, the more information is publicly available for cyber attackers to use to exploit users’ personal and professional information.

It is hard for people to realize that every single thing shared on any social media platform is available for friends and foes alike to access and use.

The UK is reportedly considering legislation that would impose a ‘duty of care’ on social media companies to regulate harmful content on their platforms. This push for an online safety bill was triggered by the high-profile death of a 14-year-old by suicide. The child had been repeatedly exposed to online content encouraging viewers to engage

FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr asserted that TikTok poses an “unacceptable national security risk” in a letter to the CEOs of Google and Apple urging the companies to remove the app from their mobile app stores. According to Carr, TikTok’s history of “surreptitious access of private and sensitive U.S. user data by persons located in Beijing

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) recently issued guidance on protecting the security of organizations’ social media accounts to reduce the risk of unauthorized access to those accounts.

The guidance, entitled The Capacity Enhancement Guide (CEG): Social Media Account Protection, provides tips for organizations to protect social media accounts from malicious cyber actors. CISA

I was scrolling through a social media site this week, and was struck by how many requests asked people to respond to questions regarding their biographical information. For example, what was the number one album when you were a senior in high school? What was your favorite beach or park when you were growing up?

I never knew that since 2006, October has been designated as National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month. According to the Department of Health and Human Service’s website, “This year’s Bullying Prevention Awareness Month marks the 10th anniversary of its initiation by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center http://www.pacer.org/bullying/.

Since 2006, the event has grown to an entire month of education and awareness activities, and is being recognized by schools and communities throughout the world.

Bullying can be combated through education and awareness. In the context of data privacy and security, cyberbullying is a form of bullying which can be harmful and devastating, particularly to teens and young adults. Cyberbullying can be accomplished through online posts on Facebook, through emails, Twitter, Snapchat, and any other form of social media or online content.

Although somewhat dated, but still applicable, some practical tips on how to combat cyberbullying for teens are outlined in The Cyberbullying Research Center publication “Preventing Cyber Bullying: Top Ten Tips for Teens

The 10 tips include:

Continue Reading Privacy Tip #55 – October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month