Parents have historically struggled with how to address their children’s online activity. Parenting styles differ, but most parents understand that monitoring and supervising their children’s online activity is important and necessary.

There is a federal law, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, (aka, COPPA) that applies to the online activities of children under the age

Last week, two Senators, Senator Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts and Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut sent a letter to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regarding apps designed for children and whether they are in compliance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), See 15 U.S.C. 6501 and regulations at 16 C.F.R. Part 312 et. seq.  The Senators stated that they are concerned that thousands of apps may “improperly track children and collect their personal information.” The Senators requested a response from the FTC by October 31. The letter also asked that the FTC “investigate whether these apps, and the advertising companies they work with, are in fact tracking children with persistent identifiers and collecting their personal information in violation of COPPA…”
Continue Reading Protecting the Privacy of Children Online – More Updates on COPPA

Protecting the privacy of our children is inherent to parenting. Parents guard against posting pictures of their children on social media or restrict the amount of time and the types of access they have on electronic devices. They may also set parental controls regarding content and try their best to protect their children. But what

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) approved TRUSTe’s proposed modifications to their Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) safe harbor program this week.

COPPA requires, among other things, that commercial website and mobile app operators that knowingly collect personal information from children under age 13 post comprehensive privacy policies on their websites and in their mobile apps, notify parents and guardians of the website’s or mobile app’s information practices, and obtain parental consent before collecting, using or disclosing any personal information from children under age 13. However, COPPA includes a ‘safe harbor’ provision whereby industry groups may seek approval from the FTC to create self-regulatory guidelines that implement “the same or great protections for children” as those in COPPA. Website and mobile app operators that participate in FTC-approved safe harbor programs are subject to the review and disciplinary procedures provided in the safe harbor guidelines in lieu of an FTC’s formal investigation or enforcement.
Continue Reading FTC Approves Modifications to TRUSTe’s COPPA Safe Harbor Program

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a six-step compliance plan to assist businesses with compliance with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). It provides clarity on who is covered by and must comply with COPPA and how companies can get parental consent. It also outlines a six-step compliance plan.

New companies

On April 6, 2017, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman (AG) announced that he has settled an investigation against TrustE for alleged violations of failing to adequately prevent illegal tracking technology on children’s websites, including Hasbro.com and Roblox.com. TrustE has agreed to pay the State $100,000 in the settlement and adopt measures to strengthen its

On December 6, 2016, The Electronic Privacy Information Center, The Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, The Center for Digital Democracy and Consumers Union filed a Complaint and Request for Investigation, Injunction and Other Relief (Complaint) with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) against Genesis Toys (Genesis) and Nuance Communications (Nuance) regarding alleged violations of the

Recently in United States v. InMobi Pte Ltd., the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) set a new standard for geolocational tracking. The FTC told app developers and app marketers one simple rule: honor consumers location privacy preferences and do not track them without permission.

InMobi is a Singapore Company that provides ads within mobile apps.

LAI Systems, LLC (LAI) and Retro Dreamer agreed to pay civil penalties of a combined $360,000 to settle charges issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that they violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by allowing advertising companies to use persistent identifiers, collected through their mobile apps, to elicit specific advertisements to children.