LAI Systems, LLC (LAI) and Retro Dreamer agreed to pay civil penalties of a combined $360,000 to settle charges issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that they violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by allowing advertising companies to use persistent identifiers, collected through their mobile apps, to elicit specific advertisements to children.

In a third update to the data breach of 6.5 million kids’ information and 5 million parents’ information, VTech Holdings Ltd. (VTech) is facing backlash from plaintiffs’ attorneys and regulators.

First, VTech Electronics North America LLC was hit with the now usual class action suits following a data breach–two so far–filed in the Northern District

This week, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) determined that companies covered by the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) can use facial recognition technologies to match a parent’s photo on a government-issued identification to “selfies” that the parent submits via mobile phone or webcam as a method of verifiable parental consent, as required by COPPA.

As a general rule, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) requires operators of websites (including mobile apps) directed to children under the age of 13 to obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting personal information from those users. COPPA sets forth a non-exhaustive list of acceptable methods for obtaining parental consent. For example, operators can