California Consumer Privacy Act

Recently, the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) announced its new initiative in investigating the data privacy practices of connected vehicle (CV) manufacturers and the related technologies. Generally, the CPPA will focus its regulatory efforts on retail, advertising platforms, online platforms, and hospitality sectors. However, since modern vehicles are now “effectively connected computers on wheels,” collecting lots of information from built-in apps, sensors, and cameras, CVs are just another source of data collection like our laptops and mobile devices. In the CPPA’s press release, the Agency stated that data privacy considerations are “critical” because CVs “often automatically gather consumers’ locations, personal preferences, and details about their daily lives.” Due to these factors, the CPPA will make inquires to CV manufacturers to understand how these companies are complying with the California Consumer Privacy Act and its amendments pursuant to the California Privacy Rights Act (collectively the CCPA).

Here’s what you need to consider if you are in the CV manufacturing industry or related technologies:Continue Reading CPPA Announces Investigation of Connected Vehicle Manufacturers’ Privacy Practices

The California Attorney General recently announced an initiative to investigate employers’ non-compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act/California Privacy Rights Act (collectively the CCPA).

At the beginning of this year, the CCPA’s disclosure requirements and consumer rights provisions became applicable to job applicants, employees (and their beneficiaries), and independent contractors. Now, the California AG’s office

The Office of the California Attorney General recently announced that it will initiate an investigative sweep and will start sending letters to businesses about their mobile apps for failure to comply with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). There is also a new online tool that allows consumers to directly notify a business of an

Since the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) released its draft regulations pursuant to the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), the biggest gripe from businesses has been the website tracking opt-out requirements. Recognition of opt-out requests from consumers could potentially cost companies some significant dollars.

The CPRA amends the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2020 and

California law will soon require businesses to treat their employees and business partners as consumers under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The CCPA and its successor legislation, the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), grant California consumers dignitary rights over their personal information collected and processed by commercial entities that do business in California. The

Congress is considering omnibus privacy legislation, and it reportedly has bipartisan support. If passed, this would be a massive shake-up for American consumer privacy, which has been left to the states up to this point. So, how does the American Data Privacy and Protection Act (ADPPA) stack up against existing privacy legislation such as the

California is the gold standard for state privacy laws, having recently enacted the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). Virginia and Colorado also have enacted comprehensive privacy laws, which will take effect in 2023. Recently, the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) released its state privacy legislation tracker.

California Attorney General Rob Bonta is serious about compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). So serious, that on January 28, 2022, also known as Data Privacy Day, he announced that his office was commencing an investigative “sweep” of “businesses operating loyalty programs in California” and sent notices of noncompliance to businesses requiring them