California Consumer Privacy Act

This week, Consumer Reports published a Model State Privacy Act. The Consumer advocacy organization proposed model legislation “to ensure that companies are required to honor consumers’ privacy.” The model legislation is similar to the California Consumer Privacy Act, but seeks to protect consumer privacy rights “by default.”  Some additional provisions of the model law

Marriott recently won dismissal of a proposed class action data breach lawsuit alleging several violations, including a violation of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The case, Arifur Rahman v. Marriott International, Inc. et al., Case No.: 8:20-cv-00654, was dismissed in an Order by U.S. District Court Judge David O. Carter on January 12, 2021.

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) expands the definition of personal information as it currently exists in the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The CPRA adds “sensitive personal information” as a defined term, which means:

(l) personal information that reveals:

(A) a consumer’s social security, driver’s license, state identification card, or passport number;

(B) a

DataGrail recently released a mid-year report on trends related to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and how it has affected consumers and businesses. The report indicates that consumers are regularly opting out of the sale of their personal information, with the “do not sell” right being the most exercised right, occurring 48 percent of

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), touted as the toughest privacy act in the country, went into effect on July 1, 2020. Although the enforcement regulations have been tweaked three times during the last year, this week California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (AG) issued the final set of rules that his office will use to

While the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) went into effect on January 1st of this year, the California Attorney General submitted the final draft of proposed regulations only last month. With the CCPA’s inclusion of a private right of action for California residents to seek actual or statutory damages if their personal information has been

On February 10, 2020, the California Attorney General’s Office released modified California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations. There are some notable differences in the regulations from the first draft, which can be seen in this redlined version. This article will highlight some of the new language added in the latest draft of the regulations.

What’s

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said last week that “knowledge is power, and in today’s world knowledge is derived from data. When it comes to your own data, you should be in control…” These words came in an Advisory highlighting California consumers’ rights under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The Advisory outlined several areas

After much anticipation and trepidation, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) went into effect on January 1, 2020. Many companies are understandably still grappling with the details of the law, the amendments, and the proposed regulations and how to comply with them.

If you have not determined whether the CCPA applies to your company, and