Photo of Linn Foster Freedman

Linn Freedman practices in data privacy and security law, cybersecurity, and complex litigation. She is a member of the Business Litigation Group and the Financial Services Cyber-Compliance Team, and chair’s the firm’s Data Privacy and Security Team. Linn focuses her practice on compliance with all state and federal privacy and security laws and regulations. She counsels a range of public and private clients from industries such as construction, education, health care, insurance, manufacturing, real estate, utilities and critical infrastructure, marine and charitable organizations, on state and federal data privacy and security investigations, as well as emergency data breach response and mitigation. Linn is an Adjunct Professor of the Practice of Cybersecurity at Brown University and an Adjunct Professor of Law at Roger Williams University School of Law.  Prior to joining the firm, Linn served as assistant attorney general and deputy chief of the Civil Division of the Attorney General’s Office for the State of Rhode Island. She earned her J.D. from Loyola University School of Law and her B.A., with honors, in American Studies from Newcomb College of Tulane University. She is admitted to practice law in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Read her full rc.com bio here.

The U.S. Department of State has announced a $10 million reward for “information leading to the identification or location of any person who, while acting at the direction or under the control of a foreign government, participates in malicious cyber activities against U.S. critical infrastructure in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).”

As we have pointed out before, it is cumbersome yet critical, to patch vulnerabilities on a timely basis. Cyber-attackers move swiftly to take advantage of known vulnerabilities and are aware of the challenges organizations have in closing those doors.

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), along with its counterparts in other countries, issued a

The cybersecurity authorities of the United States (including CISA, FBI, NSA and DOE), Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) on April 20, 2022, “to warn organizations that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could expose organizations both within and beyond the region to increased malicious cyber activity.”

According to

Unscrupulous criminals use crises to their advantage. Scammers are using the conflict in Ukraine to bilk money from people trying to help those impacted from the attacks. There are numerous accounts of scammers using old techniques to defraud people from funds and personal information.

We all want to help and what is unfolding in Ukraine

In an action against what has been described as one of the largest hacker forums in the world, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced on  April 12, 2022, that it has taken down RaidForums’ website and arrested its founder/administrator. According to DOJ, the domains seized were “Raidforums.com,” “Rf.ws,” and “Raid.lol.”

In its announcement,

Microsoft released its monthly patches this week to fix 128 vulnerabilities, including 10 rated as critical, 115 as important, and three flagged as moderately severe. One of the vulnerabilities (CVE-2022-24521 Windows Common Log File System Driver Elevations of Privilege) is being actively exploited by APT groups according to the National Security Agency, so addressing this

The Department of State’s new Bureau of Cyberspace and Digital Policy (CDP) commenced operations on April 4, 2022. According to an announcement, the “CDP bureau will address the national security challenges, economic opportunities, and implications for U.S. values associated with cyberspace, digital technologies, and digital policy.”

The bureau consists of three policy units: International

In a win for global law enforcement, Germany’s Bundeskriminalamt (BKA) announced on April 5, 2022, that it had officially taken down the infrastructure of Hydra, a Russian-based, illegal dark-web marketplace that has allegedly facilitated more than $5 billion in Bitcoin transactions since its inception in 2015. In the process of shutting it down, German authorities