Tag Archives: U.S.

Vicious Kronos Variant Osiris Malware Recently Released and Proving Dangerous

We all remember Kronos—the malicious malware that was sold by Russian underground forums in 2014 for $7,000. If you bought it, you were promised updates and development of new modules. The Kronos developers recently released a new update (dubbed Osiris), which is presently attacking individuals in Germany, Japan, and Poland, with the U.S. in the … Continue Reading

U.S. Estimates that Cyber Hacks Cost Up to $109 Billion in 2016

The Council for Economic Advisors (CEA) issued a report this month, entitled “The Cost of Malicious Cyber Activity to the U.S. Economy,” which concludes that “malicious cyber activity cost the U.S. economy between $57 billion and $109 billion in 2016.” The Executive Summary further depressingly concludes: Malicious cyber activity directed at private and public entities … Continue Reading

US-CERT Warns of New Ransomware: Bad Rabbit

The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT)is warning companies in the U.S. about a new ransomware dubbed “Bad Rabbit.” US-CERT stated that it has received multiple reports of infections by Bad Rabbit in countries around the world. According to security researchers, Bad Rabbit poses as an Adobe update and when the user clicks on the … Continue Reading

Repeal of FCC Privacy Rules Sparks Concern in U.S. and Europe

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) privacy rules required providers such as Comcast Corp. and AT&T Inc. to get subscribers’ permission before collecting and sharing their personal data. On April 4, 2017, President Donald Trump signed a congressional resolution rescinding those rules and sparking major concern both in the U.S. and Europe. Indeed, according to a … Continue Reading

Privacy Tip #60 – Cybersecurity Tips for the New Administration

It is hard to stay focused after election night. Since the new administration has a dearth of plans, here are some tips for it to get a jumpstart on cybersecurity priorities. The cybersecurity priorities for the new administration should include: helping U.S. companies combat hacking by foreign governments, including through investigative and diplomatic efforts (and … Continue Reading

In Wake of Cyber-Attacks, Regulators Focus on SWIFT as Senators Urge Obama to Press G20 to Combat Cybercrime

As cyber-attacks involving the global payment system SWIFT increase in frequency abroad, U.S. regulators are discussing steps designed to protect against similar attacks on U.S. financial institutions. The Federal Reserve, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. issued a joint letter last week to Representative Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) of … Continue Reading

A.I. Company Flock Develops Risk Analysis Program for Drone Flights

Flock, an artificial intelligence company based in London, announced its development of a risk analysis program for commercial drones that will use real-time weather information and the location of buildings and the most congested areas of people and vehicles to safely and effectively use these drones (away from crowds), such as aerial photography drones and … Continue Reading

ATM vulnerability – Banks beware!

It is said that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.  Often the same is said for an organization’s data privacy & security defensives. Could it be that the ubiquitous ATM machine is the weak link to the banking system?  Thursday, July 14, IBSintelligence.com reported that in Taiwan, thieves, possibly using a … Continue Reading

New Report finds Executives “placing their heads in the sand” on cybersecurity

A new report commissioned by Tanium and Nasdaq finds that 90% of corporate executives admit that they can’t read a cybersecurity report and up to 40% of corporate executives do not feel personally responsible for cybersecurity for their organization. The report was the culmination of a survey of 1,530 nonexecutive directors and C-Suite executives in … Continue Reading

Backdoors to encryption protocols vs. cybersecurity: weighing priorities in the U.S. and abroad

With the revelations that the Paris and San Bernardino attackers used encrypted communications to recruit, communicate and plan their attacks, the U.S. government is again pushing the tech industry to provide it backdoor access to encryption protocols. Bypassing security mechanisms through a backdoor, law enforcement believes, permits it to more effectively track users and content, … Continue Reading
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