Tag Archives: Michael Huerta

An Update on Part 107 Waivers for Night Operations

Back in August 2016, when the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced its final small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) rule (or Part 107) FAA administrator, Michael Huerta said, “Our focus is to make this as streamlined as possible [. . .] We do not envision this being a very burdensome process.” However, Part 107 limits flights … Continue Reading

Update on the Drone Flights-Over-People Rule

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) continues to work on its proposed rule which would allow the operation of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or drones, over people, expected (hopefully) to be released before the end of the Obama Administration next week. For the final rule, of course, there is no set timeline. FAA Administrator, Michael Huerta, … Continue Reading

2017: New President, New Transportation Secretary—Where Do Drones Fit?

The Drone Manufacturers Alliance (DMA) has voiced approval of President-elect Donald Trump’s nomination of Elaine Chao as the next U.S. Secretary of Transportation in its November 9 letter to Trump and the Trump-Pence Transition Team. But with that approval comes a request for Trump to “pursue a balanced legal and regulatory framework for unmanned aircraft systems … Continue Reading

FAA Holds First Unmanned Aircraft Safety Team Meeting

The first meeting of the Unmanned Aircraft Safety Team (UAST) was held on October 18-19 in Washington, D.C. This team was first announced back in August by Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Administrator Michael Huerta at the White House Drone Day. This team includes a wide variety of stakeholders from drone aviation industries and government stakeholders. … Continue Reading

FAA increases altitude for commercial drones

On March 29, 2016, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced that its “blanket” altitude authorization for Section 333 exemption for commercial drone operators will increase from 200 feet to 400 feet. After an extensive risk evaluation, the FAA determined that commercial drones can fly up to 400 feet except in restricted airspace. FAA Administrator Michael … Continue Reading
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