Just before the false alarm last weekend in Hawaii when residents were erroneously warned of an impending missile attack, think tank Chatham House issued a report stating that it had identified vulnerabilities in nuclear weapons systems located throughout the world that made them susceptible to malware and ransomware attacks that could lead to inadvertent missile

Reliance Jio, an Indian telecom upstart, compromised the personal data of over 100 million customers. This has prompted a call for increased data protection laws in India.

At present, companies in India do not have to disclose data breaches to clients. Of course this is stark contrast to companies in the European Union, which have strict data protection laws.

Pranesh Prakash, policy director at a research organization, the Centre for Internet and Society (CIS), said “this occurrence raises question of security and accountability. A rule to report a breach exists, but it is unenforceable. It says you’re not liable if you’re following reasonable security practices. What ‘reasonable’ means is not defined.”
Continue Reading Data Protection Laws Could Increase After Jio Data Break

Focused Technologies Imaging Services (Focused Technologies) of Menands, New York was awarded a $3.45 million contract by the state of New York back in 2008 to digitize and scan records of background checks of 22 million people. The information contained in the background checks included fingerprints, Social Security numbers, signatures, dates of birth, and the