The California Attorney General recently approved modified regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). One part of the modified regulations bans “dark patterns” on a website. What are dark patterns? Public comments to the proposed regulations describe dark patterns as deliberate attempts to subvert or impair a consumer’s choice to opt-out on a website.

Gardiner v. Walmart provided some guidance as to the specificity required to state a claim under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the types of damages that may be recoverable for breaches of California consumer data. On July 10, 2020, Lavarious Gardiner filed a proposed class action against Walmart, alleging that unauthorized individuals accessed

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced this week that the Office of Administrative Law approved additional California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, which became effective March 15, 2021.

The additional changes to the regulations primarily affect businesses that sell the personal information of California residents. The changes include a uniform Opt-Out Icon for the

California Governor Gavin Newsom, along with Attorney General Xavier Becerra, Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego), and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (D-Lakewood), announced the appointment of the five-member inaugural board for the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) this week.

The Board was established by the California Consumer Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) and

A federal District Court in California recently dismissed a lawsuit against Walmart that arose from an alleged data breach. (Gardiner v. Walmart, Inc., 20-cv-04618-JSW (N.D. Cal., March 5, 2021). Among other things, the court determined that California’s Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) does not apply retroactively, dismissing the CCPA claim because the plaintiff had not

This week, Consumer Reports published a Model State Privacy Act. The Consumer advocacy organization proposed model legislation “to ensure that companies are required to honor consumers’ privacy.” The model legislation is similar to the California Consumer Privacy Act, but seeks to protect consumer privacy rights “by default.”  Some additional provisions of the model law

Marriott recently won dismissal of a proposed class action data breach lawsuit alleging several violations, including a violation of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The case, Arifur Rahman v. Marriott International, Inc. et al., Case No.: 8:20-cv-00654, was dismissed in an Order by U.S. District Court Judge David O. Carter on January 12, 2021.

On December 11, 2020, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra released the fourth set of proposed modifications to the regulations of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). This fourth set of proposed modifications is in response to comments received to the third set of modifications that were released on October 12, 2020. According to