California Privacy Protection Agency

Readers of this blog know that we’ve been closely following the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) rulemaking process. California passed the law in 2020 to update the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 with additional consumer rights and business obligations. The CPRA also established a new government agency, the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA), responsible

Since the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) released its draft regulations pursuant to the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA), the biggest gripe from businesses has been the website tracking opt-out requirements. Recognition of opt-out requests from consumers could potentially cost companies some significant dollars.

The CPRA amends the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2020 and

Last week, the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) released updated California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) draft regulations and a summary of the changes. The regulations remain in the proposal stage and it is unclear when to expect finalized rules, although it is likely that this version will include near final requirements and prohibitions.

While most

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed the California Age-Appropriate Design Code Act (the Act) into law last week. This new law will require those online service providers likely to be accessed by children under 18 years old to comply with heightened privacy requirements, including incorporating privacy-by-default and privacy-by-design into their products. The 18-year age threshold for

California Governor Gavin Newsom, along with Attorney General Xavier Becerra, Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego), and Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon (D-Lakewood), announced the appointment of the five-member inaugural board for the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA) this week.

The Board was established by the California Consumer Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) and

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) recently qualified for the November 2020 ballot, and if California voters approve this initiative, the CPRA will expand the rights of California residents under the current (stringent) California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), beginning on January 1, 2023.

So what will change under the CPRA?

  1. Creation of the California Privacy