Ever since the enactment of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA), we have been watching the development of laws around the collection, use, disclosure and retention of biometric information. In general, BIPA and other biometric information privacy laws enacted since BIPA, require any company that is collecting biometric information, such as fingerprints, voice recognition,

Lifespace Communities Inc. (Lifespace), a retirement community chain with more than 15 communities in eight states, recently settled a class action for $987,850 for its alleged violation of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA).

The class action was filed in June 2020 in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois by

In Gates v. Eagle Family Foods in the Northern District of Illinois, Gregory Gates, a former sanitation and assembly line employee, alleges that Eagle Foods collected and retained his handprints without consent as part of his timekeeping requirements while he worked at the Waukegan facility in 2016 and 2018.

Eagle Family Foods (Eagle Foods) says

An Illinois employee of Power Solutions International Inc. (Power Solutions) filed suit against his employer alleging violations of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) when Power Solutions collected his fingerprints through a timekeeping system without providing consent to do so. Under BIPA, companies, including employers, are required to provide notice and consent to employees

We only have one unique face, two irises and ten fingerprints. We can’t change our biometrics like we can a credit card number. Yet many companies are collecting and using their employees’ and our biometric information for convenience without thinking about the potential consequences.

I recently went into a high-end retailer and the sales clerk

Hotel chain Fillmore Hospitality, LLC is the latest target of a proposed class action complaint filed this week, alleging violation of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). We don’t usually discuss the specific allegations in BIPA cases, but since they continue to populate the litigation landscape, we thought it would be instructive to take

On January 25, 2019, a unanimous Illinois Supreme Court held that, under that state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA), a person need not suffer actual injury or adverse effect in order to bring suit under the statute. In its decision in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corp., the Court determined that a minor child whose thumbprint was scanned as part of an amusement park’s season pass-holder program, allegedly without proper notice or consent, was an “aggrieved person” who could maintain a claim under BIPA.

BIPA imposes restrictions on how private entities collect, retain, disclose and destroy biometric identifiers, including fingerprints and other biometric information. An entity may not collect or otherwise obtain a person’s biometric identifier or information unless it: (1) informs the subject (or their legally authorized representative), in writing, that such information is being collected or stored; (2) informs the subject or their representative, in writing, of the specific purpose and length of term for which the biometric information is being collected, stored, and used; and (3) receives a written release executed by the subject or authorized representative. BIPA—the country’s only biometric privacy law with a private right of action—allows any person “aggrieved” by a violation of its provisions to bring an action against an “offending party” and to recover, for each violation, liquidated damages of $1,000 or actual damages (if greater), reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs, and any other relief that the court deems appropriate.
Continue Reading Individuals Need Not Allege Actual Injury to Sue for Damages Under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act

Two more companies are under fire for alleged violations of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA). 

Loews Hotel in Chicago was recently sued in the Circuit Court of Cook County for allegedly violating BIPA by collecting employees’ biometric information and sharing it with third parties without the employees’ consent.

According to the suit