Microsoft announced this week that it would extend the consumer rights currently given to California consumers through the California Consumer Privacy Act to all consumers—no matter where they reside.

I applaud this move (especially because I don’t reside in CA). But why should my personal information be protected differently than those who live in California?

Although many thought that WannaCry was in the rear view mirror, a recent report by Artemis, based on client experience, found that health care organizations and manufacturing companies are still being hit with the ransomware that affected hundreds of thousands of machines in 2017.

According to the report, 40 percent of Artemis’ health care clients

The bane of data security is the patch. The patch is what your IT guys are doing in the background to fix vulnerabilities in software that are known to the manufacturers, and to attempt to fix the vulnerability before hackers can exploit it.

Patching is a very important part of a security plan, but the

Security researchers at Radboud University in the Netherlands have discovered a flaw in several manufacturers’ solid state hard drive firmware that can be exploited to read data from self-encrypting drives (SED). The researchers published their findings in a paper on November 5th. The authors identified several methods they were able to use to bypass hardware

Many companies are migrating their email systems to Microsoft Office 365 (O365). The majority of security incidents in which we have been engaged in over the past six months involve a hacker successfully phishing an employee of the company (most of the time someone who is an executive in the company) and then spoofing the

On March 23, 2018, the President signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 (H.R. 1625), an omnibus spending bill that includes the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act (the CLOUD Act). Among other provisions, the CLOUD Act amends the Stored Communications Act of 1986 (18 U.S.C. §§ 2701-2712, hereinafter the

Courts are often faced with the dilemma of applying centuries, or even decades, old law to constantly evolving technological advancements.  See, e.g., Transcript of Oral Argument, United States v. Microsoft, No. 17-2 (U.S. Feb. 27, 2018) (attempting to ascertain the relationship between the Stored Communications Act, a 1986 law, and modern cloud computing

In an order issued on October 16, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari in United States v. Microsoft Corporation, a case with potentially far-reaching implications for the privacy of electronic data maintained by technology companies across the globe.

The case, which Robinson+Cole has previously discussed here, here, and here, arises from a warrant obtained by the Department of Justice (DOJ) under the Stored Communications Act (SCA).[1] The SCA was enacted in 1986 to protect the privacy of electronic communications, including by extending privacy protections to electronic records analogous to those afforded under the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.[2] In relevant part, the SCA requires a governmental entity in most instances to secure a warrant in accordance with the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure to compel disclosure of electronic communications stored by a service provider.[3]
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