It should be assumed that everything connected to the Internet can be hacked and exposed, now more than ever. It is commonplace and concerning. Internet of Things (IoT) devices are often developed and sold without a focus on security, because getting the product into the market is the top priority. We have previously commented that

A new survey released by Altman Vilandrie & Company, which surveyed 400 IT personnel who have purchased Internet of Things (IoT) security products, shows that 46 percent of companies that buy IoT security admitted they have experienced an IoT related security intrusion or breach within the last two years, representing hundreds of millions of dollars.

Police in Bentonville, Arkansas, are seeking records from an Amazon Echo device (for the second time) which may contain records in connection with a murder investigation in the home of James Andrew Bates where Victor Collins was found dead in Bates’ hot tub last year. Echo is an always-on digital assistant that can answer questions,

Last week, Brian Krebs reported that hackers using a malware dubbed “Marai” have identified hundreds of thousands of home and office devices that have weak security. Then the hackers released the malware publicly so anyone can use it and intrude into home and office devices that do not have proper security to thwart the attack

The Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company has announced that it is offering “the first personal lines cyber insurance program for consumers, protecting against computer attacks, cyber extortion, online fraud and the breach of personal information involving smart homes, computers and connected home devices.”

With the increase in the Internet of Things, the company

Almost one year ago, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released its “Internet of Things (IoT): Privacy and Security in a Connected World” report urging companies to implement best practices for consumers’ privacy and data security, and shortly thereafter, introduced the new Office of Technology Research and Investigation unit to protect consumers from IoT

On September 18, 2015, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued its draft Framework for Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS), which is “intended to provide a methodology for understanding, designing and building CPS including those  with multiple applications.” CPS are smart systems that interact between physical and computational components. These interconnected and integrated systems “can

The Internet of Things allows consumers to program and monitor all sorts of equipment, devices and appliances, including smart meters, ovens, TVs and refrigerators. It is well known that most of these devices that are connected to the internet do not have any security protections, as they have been designed solely for consumer convenience.

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