Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act

It seems that 2016 will mean MORE child identity theft. Why? Because with the increased amount of data collection from children and young adults at schools, health care facilities, retailers, and by advertising companies, hackers can gain access to centralized data systems with a plethora of high-value information from children.  However, perhaps 2016 is also

LAI Systems, LLC (LAI) and Retro Dreamer agreed to pay civil penalties of a combined $360,000 to settle charges issued by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that they violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by allowing advertising companies to use persistent identifiers, collected through their mobile apps, to elicit specific advertisements to children.

On Monday, December 14, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced a “user-friendly” online aircraft registration system for owners of drones (or more officially called “small unmanned aircrafts”) that weigh more than 0.55 pounds but less than 55 pounds. This registration is a statutory requirement that applies to all types of aircrafts. Anyone who has owned

In a third update to the data breach of 6.5 million kids’ information and 5 million parents’ information, VTech Holdings Ltd. (VTech) is facing backlash from plaintiffs’ attorneys and regulators.

First, VTech Electronics North America LLC was hit with the now usual class action suits following a data breach–two so far–filed in the Northern District

As a general rule, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) requires operators of websites (including mobile apps) directed to children under the age of 13 to obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting personal information from those users. COPPA sets forth a non-exhaustive list of acceptable methods for obtaining parental consent. For example, operators can