Carpenter v. United States

We write about data breaches and privacy issues all the time. We are desensitized in some ways to the fact that our privacy may have been, or will be, compromised and, quite frankly, many people now distrust some of the very companies with which they shared their information. California led the way regarding privacy legislation

Last Thursday, the United States Supreme Court heard arguments in Carpenter v. United States.  At issue was whether the FBI violated the Fourth Amendment when it obtained the cellphone location records of Timothy Carpenter.  The FBI used these records to establish Mr. Carpenter’s whereabouts during time periods in which certain armed robberies occurred.  The government argued that Mr. Carpenter did not have an expectation of privacy in these records and, thus, no warrant was required.  Mr. Carpenter argued that “carrying a smartphone, checking for new emails from one’s boss, updating the weather forecast, and downloading directions ought not license total surveillance of a person’s entire life.”
Continue Reading US Supreme Court Evaluates Privacy of Cell Phone Data