IDTechEx, which provides market research on emerging technology, analyzed California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) autonomous vehicle collision reports. Per California regulation, every company testing autonomous vehicles in California must notify the state’s DMV of any collision. IDTechEx reviewed those reports, which cover about a two-and-a-half-year period. James Jeffs, IDTechEx’s technology analyst, said that “[i]t

Blackbaud, which suffered a data breach of its customers’ data in a ransomware attack in 2020, in which it admitted paying the ransom in a double extortion attack [view related posts], is facing multiple class action cases following the attack. The cases have been consolidated in multi-district litigation and now comprise 29 cases.

The

A fertility clinic in California cannot escape a lawsuit brought by a patient after the clinic sent private information to the individual’s entire work team.

The clinic, Lane Fertility Institute for Education and Research (Lane), emailed a client regarding an embryo transfer procedure she had undergone the prior year, seeking information about her resulting pregnancy.

With the signature of Governor Jared Polis last week on the Colorado Privacy Act, Colorado became the third state (following California and Virginia) to adopt a comprehensive consumer privacy law.

We will provide you with a more comprehensive summary of the new Virginia and Colorado laws in the coming weeks, but for now, the highlights

The state of Virginia recently enacted a law banning local law enforcement and campus police departments from using facial recognition technology. Facial recognition technology is defined as an “electronic system for enrolling, capturing, extracting, comparing, and matching an individual’s geometric facial data to identify individuals in photos, videos, or real time.” The law states that

Gardiner v. Walmart provided some guidance as to the specificity required to state a claim under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the types of damages that may be recoverable for breaches of California consumer data. On July 10, 2020, Lavarious Gardiner filed a proposed class action against Walmart, alleging that unauthorized individuals accessed

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced this week that the Office of Administrative Law approved additional California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, which became effective March 15, 2021.

The additional changes to the regulations primarily affect businesses that sell the personal information of California residents. The changes include a uniform Opt-Out Icon for the