The California Attorney General recently approved modified regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). One part of the modified regulations bans “dark patterns” on a website. What are dark patterns? Public comments to the proposed regulations describe dark patterns as deliberate attempts to subvert or impair a consumer’s choice to opt-out on a website.

Gardiner v. Walmart provided some guidance as to the specificity required to state a claim under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and the types of damages that may be recoverable for breaches of California consumer data. On July 10, 2020, Lavarious Gardiner filed a proposed class action against Walmart, alleging that unauthorized individuals accessed

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced this week that the Office of Administrative Law approved additional California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations, which became effective March 15, 2021.

The additional changes to the regulations primarily affect businesses that sell the personal information of California residents. The changes include a uniform Opt-Out Icon for the

A federal District Court in California recently dismissed a lawsuit against Walmart that arose from an alleged data breach. (Gardiner v. Walmart, Inc., 20-cv-04618-JSW (N.D. Cal., March 5, 2021). Among other things, the court determined that California’s Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) does not apply retroactively, dismissing the CCPA claim because the plaintiff had not

Marriott recently won dismissal of a proposed class action data breach lawsuit alleging several violations, including a violation of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The case, Arifur Rahman v. Marriott International, Inc. et al., Case No.: 8:20-cv-00654, was dismissed in an Order by U.S. District Court Judge David O. Carter on January 12, 2021.

On December 11, 2020, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra released the fourth set of proposed modifications to the regulations of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA). This fourth set of proposed modifications is in response to comments received to the third set of modifications that were released on October 12, 2020. According to

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) requires businesses covered by the CCPA to notify their employees of the categories of personal information the business collects about employees and the purposes for which the categories of personal information are used. The categories of personal information are broadly defined in the CCPA and include personal information such

With the passage of the ballot initiative known as the Consumer Privacy Rights Act (CPRA or Act) in California, we are presenting several blog articles on different topics related to this new law. Last week, we wrote about the newly-added definition of sensitive information. This week we will focus on some key effective dates

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) expands the definition of personal information as it currently exists in the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The CPRA adds “sensitive personal information” as a defined term, which means:

(l) personal information that reveals:

(A) a consumer’s social security, driver’s license, state identification card, or passport number;

(B) a

According to the Los Angeles Times and other media outlets, Californians passed Proposition 24, also known as the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA). With 71.61 percent of precincts reporting, the measure passed with 56.1 percent of the vote. We wrote about the CPRA last week, and we provided an overview of this new