Nuala Droney

Nuala Droney

Nuala Droney is the chair of the firm’s Intellectual Property Litigation Team and a member of the White-Collar Defense and Corporate Compliance Team and Electronic Discovery and Information Management Team.  She represents clients in complex civil and criminal litigation matters in federal and state courts. Nuala routinely counsels clients in matters involving allegations of computer crime, trade secret misappropriation, and breach of policies concerning data security. Her courtroom experience includes both jury and bench trials, as well as a full spectrum of contested hearings. Nuala graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law and Yale College, magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa. Read her rc.com bio here.

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Connecticut Cyber Task Force Announced

The U.S. Attorney’s Office of the District of Connecticut has announced the creation of a Connecticut Cyber Task Force (“CCTF”) in partnership with the FBI, DEA, Secret Service, Homeland Security, IRS, Connecticut State Police, and 11 local police departments from throughout Connecticut as well as other federal authorities. The CCTF’s initial focus will be twofold: … Continue Reading

DOJ Announces Project Focused on Admissibility of Forensic Evidence

This morning, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced an initiative aimed at “examining and strengthening forensic science.” Presumably, the initiative will impact how the DOJ approaches digital forensic evidence in criminal prosecutions. Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein made the announcement at the International Association for Identification’s (IAI) conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The IAI … Continue Reading

Connecticut State Police Lead the Way in Training Electronic Storage Device Dogs

The Connecticut State Police have taken the lead in training police dogs skilled in the art of detecting hidden data. As more and more crimes involve electronic evidence, criminal enforcement agencies throughout the country are recognizing the need to find that evidence quickly. Data detecting dogs help do this by sniffing out chemicals associated with … Continue Reading

FBI’s cyber most wanted: Spotlight on Firas Dardar and Ahmed Agha

New additions to the FBI’s Cyber’s Most Wanted List show “the line between ordinary criminal hackers and potential national security threats is increasingly blurry,” according to Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Carlin. The FBI is offering a $100,000 award for information leading to the arrest of two Syrian nationals, suspected of committing dozens … Continue Reading

The FBI’s “Cyber Most Wanted”

We’ve all heard of the FBI’s “Most Wanted” list, but fewer people know that the FBI has a special most wanted list just for computer criminals.  The FBI’s “Cyber’s Most Wanted” list features the FBI’s most wanted computer criminals on the run today. The current list consists of 20 men, all charged with some type … Continue Reading

Feds focus on damage to computers as basis for Computer Fraud and Abuse Act prosecution

Last week, a federal judge sentenced Yijia Zhang, a computer systems manager, to 31 months in federal prison for transferring thousands of his employer’s electronic files to European storage sites.  The case highlights the potential power of an overlooked clause of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), 18 U.S.C. § 1030. The prosecution was … Continue Reading

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the “Cannibal Cop”: awaiting the Second Circuit’s decision

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act began as a federal criminal statute, but it has turned into an oft-used weapon in civil litigation.  See U.S.C. § 1030, et seq. (CFAA). Now, criminal and civil litigants await the Second Circuit’s decision on what exactly the CFAA covers. Looking at the statute’s plain language, the CFAA applies when … Continue Reading

Sony Pictures’ hacked emails reveal privileged communications

The 2014 Sony hack is again in the news, this time highlighting the threat that data breaches pose to the attorney-client privilege.  On April 16, 2015, WikiLeaks announced that it had posted and indexed hacked Sony emails.  Sony is now urging media outlets to be careful with the hacked emails that contain Sony’s attorney-client privilege … Continue Reading
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