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Deborah George is a member of Robinson+Cole’s Business Litigation Group as well as its Data Privacy + Cybersecurity Team. Ms. George advises clients on and focuses her practice on data privacy and security, cybersecurity, and compliance with related state and federal laws. She also has experience providing counsel in civil litigation and employment law matters. She has significant experience offering advice and counsel on legal issues related to human services agencies, including Medicaid, as well as drafting and reviewing contracts, business associate agreements, and data use agreements. Read her full rc.com bio here.

The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) expands the definition of personal information as it currently exists in the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). The CPRA adds “sensitive personal information” as a defined term, which means:

(l) personal information that reveals:

(A) a consumer’s social security, driver’s license, state identification card, or passport number;

(B) a

Proposition 24 is known as the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (CPRA). It is on the ballot in California on November 3, and if it passes it will amend and expand certain provisions of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Some say it’s CCPA 2.0, however, there are some provisions that make the CPRA

Recently we wrote about two amendments to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) that were awaiting signature on Governor Newsom’s desk: AB 1281, which extends the one-year exemptions for employee information and business to business information for another year until January 1, 2022; and AB 713, which provides an exemption from

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) currently exempts from its provisions certain information collected by a business about a natural person in the course of the person acting as a job applicant, employee, owner, director, officer, medical staff member, or contractor of a business. This exemption is set to expire on December 31,

The California Attorney General submitted the final proposed California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations on June 1, 2020 to the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) for review. According to the Attorney General’s submission, OAL has thirty working days to review the regulations, plus an additional sixty calendar days under the Governor’s Executive Order N-40-20

The New York Department of Financial Services (DFS) recently issued guidance to its regulated entities regarding heightened cybersecurity awareness as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. DFS described three primary areas of heightened risk during this time: remote working, increased instances of phishing and fraud, and third-party risks.

With respect to remote working, DFS noted